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FIVE CENTS 

ISSUED FRIDAY 
IHE WORLDS GREATEST 


DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO THE 


0 THE COPY 

DATED SATUPDAY 

AMUSEMENT NEWSPAPER 



THIS WEEKS NEWS THIS WEEK 


PROFESSION OF ENTERTAINMENT 


Vol. VI. No. 12. 


CHICAGO 


September 10, 1910 












































2 


THE SHOW WORLD 


September 10 , 1910. 


Sells-Floto Wants to Sell 

All of its stock cars, 60 feet long, because we are going to rebuild brand new 
trains for season 1911. Sleepers and flats have nearly all been sold. Delivery of 
cars will be made November 15th. 

Sells-Floto Wants to Engage 

performers doing acts of all and every kind for season 1911. Those who desire 
engagements will please send photos in costume, state fully what they do and 
name lowest salary so that letter-writing may be avoided. Let it be understood 
that no act is too big or teo expensive or can carry too many props, if the display 
made lends itself to extravagant advertising and makes good with the public. 

Sells-Floto Wants Side Show Attractions 

of every nature and description. Suggestions of any kind whether they have been 
fashionable or if an entirely new idea are welcomed, and prompt attention is 
promised all correspondents. 

Sells-Floto Will Have a 50-Car Circus 

season 1911—expects to prove to its owners that the best and most remarkable 
show can be given for 25 cents admission and earn plenty of money, because 
this season has proven it to be so with a circus not half good enough to satisfy 
Sells-Floto. 

Sells-Floto Wants for Menagerie 

animals (excepting Cats, Hip. or Giraffes, which have been purchased) which 
may amuse or interest circus patrons. 

Sells-Floto Wants Folks to Write 

for engagements for 1911 in all and every department, but those who do not want to 
work or have the slightest idea of graft of any nature in their minds, save stamps. 

Sells-Floto Does Not Play 

the public for suckers, but as kings and queens, and all employees are expected 
to do their best to help make all visitors welcome, have a good time. 

Sells-Floto Treats All 

its employees in first class manner and its rules governing are based on plain, 
simple, common sense. 

Performers desiring engagements may address 
CHRIS 0. BROWN (care Sullivan & Considine), 1440 Broadway, New York City 
Or PAUL G0UDR0N (care Sullivan & Considine), 67 So. Clark St., Chicago 
Or H. H. TAMMEN, 236 Symes Building, Denver, Colorado 

All others address : : H. H. TAMMEN, 236 Symes Building, Denver, Colorado 











‘THE PAPER WITH Jl HEART ANT) A SOUL’ 



3H0WM0RLD 


The Show People's Nee 


CHICAGO. SEPTEMBER 10. 1910. For ./111 Kinds of Show People 


RINGLINGS SPIKE COFFIN 1“, _ oia _ wm _, 
INST. JOSEPH, MO. 





















































4 THE SHOW WORLD 


RELIABLE RECORD OF VAUDEVILLE ACTS 








































THE SHOW WORLD 


5 


REPORTS ON ACTS NOW IN CHICAGO 


reek^and jJST& a SSSS a tS 

V&K SSKM* 1 !rASSf! 



f^SS^TtSSSk^ 
ofSTUSsSK 


^Wr^MouWon-On next to closing 



be pleased _I _ 

about the Chicago rialto _ 

hospital. 


traded sojourn In tl 


aWK'WKKt 

sKSKF&SS !*3 


Pelix & Cairo “Plop.” 

Felix & Calre, who are in their second 
week at the Temple at Grand Rapids, 
are reported to have been voted ordinary 
u that city. Rumor has it that the 


Chares Moreland Around Again. 

Charles Moreland’s many friends will 
that he_ is up and 


fVac a e°a? 


Fables in Vaudeville No. 17 

"The DARK HORSE That WON In A GREAT HANDICAP Race” 

By FRANCIS OWEN of Owen <S> Hoffman 




tEstvA m u e D B E^ L LL 0 E me Al 


1 have stamped 
MAINE t( 
PHOTOS 
right hand NI 


to which of them was the BIGGEST pest, 
i NUISANCE. “WELL,” said the man 
want to boast, but I think you have to 
BET when it comes to being a PEST. 


e and line of busii 
NIA, and have ev 
ERS’ offices and i 
■ows weary 

ns UNM. 
e SINGLl 
), but I’m s 
ATOR of 



you 

being a 
THEATER from 
collections of 
there. My 


t of SCENERY 
md CLEAN.’ 


“I have to give it to 
PEST myself as every 
saying ‘I was a RIOT 
times. Most ; 
it shows that I have 
ie CONTORTIONIST 

_, ... began. “I am better kno.... ... 

but you just ask CIRCUS people what kind 


forward. 

?EST I am. I am the man who is always saying, ‘Why H 
SLIVERS when he was only getting FIFTEEN dollars, and I TAUl 

*■ A rEST C -' "Yh. -Lraft f ” y ■ 




BOYS, like 
EGITIMATE 
combined. I 


class PEST." The “LEGIT” with the 
pityingly and issued the following GRA’ 

ask aWiTtfi bK 
have never failed to tell every one I ever met that once I was LEADING 
stole the. show away from him.” The 
him admiringly and said, “I have heard 



of you, but great as ; 

NUISANCE. I am the 
and will enter the mosl 
ask for them when you . 
like an AGENT grabbing a 
arrived for rehearsal, and i 

San with e the r STAMP and hid in their DARK DRESSING ROOMS as 
a new-comer walked in the stage door. “Why did you run,” asked the 
LEGIT, “you scared me so I ran too” “Why,” said the STAMP 
fiend, “didn’t you know him? When HE is around we ALL have to 
hide. HE is the GREATEST PEST, the BIGGEST NUISANCE, and 
the KING of us all. That is the fellow who is always saying, ‘They 
WANTED me on the ORPHEUM time, but WOULDN’T pay me my 
SALARY.”’ 


to ask for _ _ _ 

™L” P 7 ,S,? SS SVechesYr” 

argument stopped, for there was one 
"""TS followed the example of the 
DARK DRESSING ROOMS ; 


Cheer up, NO matter how big 
MORAL PEST you think YOU are, there i 


is 






aSMSHBK 



La Moines, although she is always 
companied by her husband in 
rounds; Nina Straw, of Shannon „ 
Straw; Mrs. Roselle, of the Roselles 
Emma Schilling, of Schilling's Colleens 
Billie Methven, of the Methven Sisters 
Madame Bedini, of the Bedini Family 
Lola Y’Berri, of the big dancing act 
Minnie Hoffman, of Owen & Hoffman; 
Miss Areola, of Areola & Co.; Jane Dara, 
of Jane Dara & Co.; Mrs. Craig, of 
Musical Craigs; Mrs. Godlewsky, of the 
Godlewsky Troupe, and scores of other 
women are handling successful vaude¬ 
ville offerings very ably.” 


PLAYING 

Sullivan - Considine Time 

_ This Week: 

Empress. Cincinnati 

_ Next Week: 

Empress, Milwaukee 

X iiihitiivg 

YLOPHONI3 
L’ ELL15XCB} 


TUB BOY WITH THE BIO XYLOPHONE 

MUSICAL ALWARD 

Twelve Minutes in Harniony Erom Classics to Ragtime 

























INDEPENDENT AGENTS 

ARE COMBINING 

Churchill, Keefe, et al., Evidently Plan to Loosen Grasp of 




Trouble to No Ooe 

DUNBAR’S GOAT CIRCUS 



PLAYING 12 INSTRUMENT 


“The Gipsy Players’ 

In Fifteen Minutes. AsKA.E. Myers 




































September 10, 1910. 


THE SHOW WORLD 


7 


NOW PLAYING S.-C. CIRCUIT—THIS WEEK—EMPRESS, CINCINNATI 

BEATRICE TURNER 

“BEATRICE TURNERWAS GIVEN (AHD DESERVED) A WARM WELCOME."—Cincinnati Enquirer. “EASILY THE HIT OF THE Bill."—Cincinnati Post. 



1 French's Recent Billing at 1 



James L. Oakes, of Clinton, Iowa, 
nas been chosen to succeed the former 
opera house manager, Ray Swan, who 
win not be here again. Bookings are as 
follows: Morey Stock Company, Au¬ 
gust 29 to September 3; “Pinkey, The 
•A?« nker { on September 5; “The 

CHmn*” September 6; “The Lyman 


» "“i book through the Western 
vaudeville Managers’ Association. 


OPENING SEASON AT 

KEITH’S COLUMBIA 


Cincinnati House Plays the Eastern Brand of Vaudeville 
Now—Jake Wells Opens Theater 



Labor day with vaudeville, booked by 
the United office. Neither Jake Wells 
nor George Hickman, local manager, 
would make a speech, although the 
audience was In the right humor. “The 
Globe of Death,” in which C. B. and 
Bertha Clark ride on bicycles, proved a 
good headline feature. Loney Haskel 
amused with a monologue. Louis Guer- 
tin’s gymnastic offering was decidedly 
good. Prlncdes Miroff pleased with 
songs and dances. Edmund Stanley & 
Co. delighted the audience with “The 
Garden of Love.” Rae & Brosche, In 




.. displays 

_... Vesta & 

Teddy do aerobatic stunts. 

At the Empress Captain Pickard’s 
Educated Seals are drawing the big 
business for which the house Is noted. 
Earl Flynn and Nettie McLaughlin 
make a hit with songs and dances; 
Flynn is a native of this city. Boutin 
& Tillson offer "A Yard Full of Music” 
which is unique and novel. Betsy 
Bacon & Co. please with “Treborali’s 
Wedding Day.” De Hollis & Velora do 
comedy Juggling. Hickey & Nelson make 
fun, and the TrOcadero Quartet sings. 


“NOBODY FROM STARBAND” 

IS A HIT ON THE ROAD 

Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 7.—“Miss No¬ 
body from Starland,” which is at the 
Grand this week, is an exceptionally 
pleasing show. The rise of the curtain 
for the second act, showing a bare stage 
with a rehearsal In progress. Is a fea¬ 
ture which Is attracting much attention. 
Olive Vail as “Miss Nobody" plays the 
part nicely and brings to It a good 
voice. Ralph Riggs, who succeeds Ralph 
Herz, does very nicely. Lawrence 
Comer, as “Halliday,” makes a hit and 
the song “I’d Rather Love What I Can’t 





ARTISTS’ PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Acts Produced and Routed. Artists Booked 
and Managed. Personal Attention to all Clients. 

MURRAY BLEE & JUNDT ALF. C. 


Neutral Booking Exchange of America 

Suite 400, No. 120 Randolph St., Cor. Clark, Chlcazo 

Telephone—Randolph 2155 
Send open time with immediate k permanent address 

' • • • ■••••■ ■ r •■■■■■■ 


































































8 


THE SHOW WORLD 


DRAWING THE COLOR LINE ON BERT WILLIAMS 


Chicago Newspapers Decline to Print His Picture, but He’s the Hit of the New “Follies” Just the Same—Laurette Taylor 
Without Opportunity in “The Lady in Waiting”—“The Girl and the Drummer” 































September 10, 1910. 


THE SHOW WORLD 


9 


























10 


THE SHOW WORLD 


September 10, 1910. 


THE 

SHO®ORLD 


Entered as second-class matter, June 26, 1907, 
at the Postoffice at Chicago, Illinois, under the 
act of Congress of March 8, 1879. 


The Show World Publishing Co. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE BUILDING 

CIGHTY-SEVSN SOUTH CLARK STREET 

CHICAGO 


LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
CENTRAL 1677 

Cable Address (Registered) “Showorld” 


WARREN A. PATRICK 

Managing Editor. 


ADVERTISING RATES 

Fifteen centamper agate line. ^Fourteen li 


SUBSCRIPTIONS 

(Payable in advance.) 

Two dollars and fifty cents the year. De¬ 
livered anywhere on earth. 

On sale at all news stands, five cents the 

dealers send orders through your news coxn- 
Pa &ste m News Company, general distributors. 


lanuscripts, articles, letters 
o “The Show World” are 
risk, and The Show World 
T expressly repudiates any 
bility for their safe custody 


and pictures sent 


September 10, 1910 


We do not believe that Chicago is a 
poor show town. No series of articles 
in daily papers, purporting to be in¬ 
terviews with prominent theater man¬ 
ager? and producers, can convince us. 
We • have only to see people turned 
away from a score of theaters in one 
night to believe that the Chicago pub¬ 
lic likes its amusement. Possibly the 
public avoids some shows and some 
theaters. If so, it is the fault of the 
manager and producer. Give the Chi¬ 
cago public what it wants and it 
wants it. 


SHOULD GO FURTHER. 

(Waukegan (Ill.) Sun.) 


The Chicago Show World has started 
a long needed crusade against “affinity” 
songs used on the stage, such as “That 
Lovin' Melody Rubenstein Wrote” and 
others. Now another crusade should be 
started against the mushy-mushy song 
so often heard and people should refuse 
their patronage to the actor who will 
sing either kind of song. 


x Show World reporter as hundreds 
of pleasure seekers were unable to gain 
admission to the Colonial Wednesday 
afternoon. The foyers of the “theater 
beautiful” were literally Jammed with 
ticket buyers eager to see The Follies 
of 1910,” and the engagement will t 


TO OUR READERS. 

The Show World would like 
to hear from readers of the pa¬ 
per. We want your ideas. 
Write a letter occasionally on 
some current event that inter¬ 
ests you. Letters should be 
short—not over 250 words—and 
written on one side of the sheet. 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

THE 


GRAND OPERA HOUSE BLDG. 
Chicago. U. S. A. 


YOONG MAN, HAVE YOGA NOSE 
FOR AMOSEMENT NEWS? 
IF SO—GET BUSY. 


ENERGETIC CORRESPONDENTS WANTED 


THE SHOW WORLD is desirous of securing representatives In every 
section of the United States and Canada, and to that end correspondence is 
Invited from young men of good personal address in all communities not yet 
covered by this journal. We want energetic, wide awake correspondents 
of business ability who will, acting as absolutely impartial observers of 
events, provide us with the latest and most reliable NEWS of happenings in 
their locality. EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY; LIBERAL COMMISSIONS. 
For full particulars address, WARREN A. PATRICK, Managing Editor of 
THE SHOW WORLD, Chicago. 

THE SHOW WORLD IS AN INDEPENDENT AMUSE¬ 
MENT NEWSPAPER, NOT CONTROLLED BY A TRUST 


THEATRICALS IN CHICAGO 


A good story ___ ___— 

Rialto in which L. E. Snell, assistant 
: the Chicago opera house 


(Continued from page 8.) 
going the rounds of jovial and congenial spirits In Wash- 
™ —- ington street, frequently treats his 

patrons . to excerpts from “Trovatore,” 
“Rigoletto,’ ’and other operas. G. V. 
Gabellin is the singer, and he has a voice 
that ought to land him on the stage 
any time he wants to get there, but he 
is in business, and only sings now and 
then for the delectation of his friends, 
and to please Message. 


and William Anthony McGuire, ___ 
Chicago playwright, figure as the prin¬ 
cipal actors. It seems that Mr. Snell 
donned a new and immaculately clean 
collar. He felt justly proud of it, too, 
and when McGuire came along and put 
his moist fingers on it, Mr. Snell’s choler 
arose mightily. He turned and said 
some things to McGuire that would not 
look well in the Show World, and Mc¬ 
Guire retorted; 

“Will you sell me the collar for the 
fifteen cents you say It cost you?” 

“Sure I will,” replied Snell without 
thinking. 

With that McGuire whipped out the 
money, and handing it to Snell, pro¬ 
ceeded to rip the collar from his neck 
at a rapid rate. 

Snell got him a new collar in a few 
minutes, and McGuire is keeping the 
other one as a memento of an odd in¬ 
cident in the lives of theatrical per¬ 
sonages. 

And, by the way, McGuire tells a 
rather amusing incident concerning our 
jovial friends, Louie Houseman and 
Richard Carle. McGuire was driving 
his car along the Lake Shore Drive one 
night when he heard a puffing noise 
ahead, and gazing closer saw Houseman 
and Carle, plugging along in Houseman’s 
little car. Now Houseman is short and 
thick and what George W. Munroe would 
call “plump.” Carle is long, lanky, and 
thin. They made a very odd looking 
couple, and as the car puffed along it 
finally gave a snort and stopped dead 
still. 

First Houseman got out and looked 
under the machine, and then Carle took 
a peep. They couldn’t ascertain just 
what was the matter, so Carle was 
dispatched to a garage in the distance. 




. .. the Gar- 
id that Mme. 
the Lyric for 


_back with a mechanic 

_ __ _ tools and a thorough ex- 

ilnation was made. 


_ _ _ i thing wrong with the 

machine,” said the mechanic. 

Then a happy thought struck him. 
“When did you fill the tank with gaso¬ 
line last?” he asked of Houseman. 

"Why, I put a split of gasoline in last 
week,” replied the dimpled Houseman. 

Examination was made, and It was 
found that the tank was as dry as a 
Southern colonel in a prohibition county. 

Some gasoline was administered, the 
tall man and the short man piled in 
and the little car went puffing up the 
drive as though nothing had happened. 

The Chicago Grand Opera company 
liottpT- lonlr to its laurels. “Doc” 


It would appear that our good friend 
U. J. (Sport) Hermann, fanager of the 
Cort theater, Is very particular about 
his laundry. Because one of his shirts 
was not done up In the proper manner, 
so it Is averred and alleged, he used his 
fists on Arthur L. Baker, manager of 
the Columbia Yacht club, with the re¬ 
sult that the matter has come into the 
courts. Now, if it had been a saw-edge 
collar, there might have been Just prov¬ 
ocation for a fight. 

It is now announced that “The Wife 
Tamers,” current at present at the Prin¬ 
cess, is to be shuffled-*“ "" "— 

rick theater for a ru: 

Alla Nazlmova is to gc _____ 

her Chicago engagement. “We Won’t 
Go Home ’Till Morning,” which sounds 
rather frisky, is the attraction booked 
for the Princess, and Dave Lewis and 
A1 Fields are to be in the cast. 
Whoopee! - 

Dan Cotter, who began his theatrical 
career as an usher at Bush Temple, is 
now the treasurer at the Garrick theater. 
Manfred M. S. Kernwein, who has had 
some little experience In different box 
offices in Chicago, is the assistant treas¬ 
urer. Both of these young men are pop¬ 
ular, young, and full of vim and vigor. 
They are polite also, and that should 
add not a little to their efficiency in 
this box office. 


agent, and he has 

__.____ up quite a little 

interest in the production which opened 
the Colonial Monday night. Of course, 
he had some little assistance from James 
Jay Brady, the new manager of the 
Colonial, who is considered some press 
agent by those who know what press 
agenting is. 

Hugh Stuart Campbell, the artist so 
well known to the theatrical fraternity, 
has returned from a sketching trip that 
reached from Chicago to Washington, 
thence to Philadelphia and by the way of 
Norfolk to Atlantic City and then back 
to New York and Cincinnati. Mr. Camp¬ 
bell made pictures of several prominent 
players and singers while away. Mrs. 
Campbell accompanied him on the trip. 



TO THE EDITOR 


Enroute, Sept. 1; 1910. 


To the Editor- 
Warren A. Patrick, 

General Director Show World, 
Chicago, Ill. 

Have just finished the last issue ot 
-- great Pj^Per^and^Jt certainly is 


O. It. You certainly give u„ „„„ 
minus the unnecessary knocks which 
—— *- *-O plentiful these days. It’s 


Myron Fagan has arrived in the' city' 
and is attempting to get his “Heart¬ 
strings” on the stage. The piece was 
offered in London by Lena Ashwell. Mr. 
Fagan also had his “The Dreamer" put 


n London, by Beerbohm Tree. 


Thelma Textrude, at one time in the 
stock company that held the hoards at 
Bush Temple during the Edwin Than- 
houser regime, has been engaged to play' 
the role of Trixie in “The Isle of Spice” 
this season. Miss Textrude is possessed 


Charles L. Hertzman is in town ahead 
of Laurette Taylor in “The Girl in I 
Waiting” now current at the Olympic. 


With the able assistance of Sam Lederer, 
Mr. Hartzman was enabled to make a 
good flash in the Chicago papers for 


the attraction. 


RINGLING AGENT 

HAS NAME IN PAPER. 

The much discussed policy of the i 
Ringling Brothers, as it is explained i 
by showmen who appear to know 
what they are talking about, which 
insists that a press agent is employed| 
to boom the show and never himself, i 
is not maintained this summer or else: 
a slip up has been made. An item! 
appearing in the Baraboo, Wis., Even¬ 
ing News, has the name of a press 
agent mentioned. It reads; 

“That the Ringling Brothers of: 
Baraboo, Wis., are sincere in their 
offer to give oil portraits of them¬ 
selves to Curator Harlan for the Iowa i 
Hall of Fame was the statement of 
Harry Lindley, representative of the 
circus owners at Des Moines. The 
Iowa Hall of Fame is reserved fori 
native born Iowans who become 
famous, and the Ringlings regard: 
themselves as eligible as much as isi 
Lillian Russell, so Mr. Lindley avers.' 
The Ringling Brothers are all natives 
of McGregor, Iawo.” 


They’d Like to Know 


Clarissa, Show World. 

I am a woman of fifty, with a beauti¬ 
ful mezzo-soprano voice and, honest, I; 
look like twenty. I’m In love with a' 
handsome fellow, with a perfect bass 
voice; he’s twenty, but, honest, he looksi 
like fifty. When we sing, the doctor 
in the next block thinks he’s Setting! 
an emergency call. Should I marry him? 


P. S.—He wants me to go into vaude¬ 
ville. Please don’t tell 

■ I want to spring a. surprise on him. i 
i enclosing our picture. Please p 


It and this P. S. in your news notes. 


■'Constant.'’ 

Constant:— . 

We have referred your letter to oui 
advertising department. Did you send 
us a picture of Mr. and Mrs. Methusalen 
by mistake? 


Editor. 




r by all means. 


Editor. 

Clarissa, Show World. . 

leading- lady and Fin in lo™ 


a chorus boy; would you advise m 


d marry him? 


a thousand times, “No”! 


J. R. Williams, formerly at ® T r 
view, is the new doorman at the 1 ’* 1 
~ '' > opera house. Resplendent m 


...... uniform, he makes an imposing; 

appearance and he fits in nicely w 
the new playhouse. 


ADVERTISE IN THE SNOW WORID 


ADVERTISE IN THE SHOW WORLD 







































September 10, 1(110. 


THE SHOW WORLD 


11 



THE FIELD OF STAGE MUSIC 

Review of Existing Conditions and Current Happenings Among 
the Song Writers and Publishers 

BY C. P. MCDONALD 


CURRENT SMUT 


CLASSIFICATION OF SONGS 

AND INSTRUMENTAL NUMBERS 


THE SHOW WORLD submits herewith another example of rancid depravity. 
This set of words, like the set quoted in our last issue, demonstrates to what 
depths of degradation and shamelessness some song writers and publishers will 
sink in panhandling for notoriety. Mr. Berlin and Mr. Snyder have accomplished 
their purpose; they have won notoriety through writing and publishig this salacious 
“song." But it is a notoriety which is both unsavory and unenviable. 

GRIZZLY BEAR. 

[Word by Irving Berlin. Music by George Botsford. Published by Ted Snyder 
Company, New York City.] 


_ . _ .. in’ dances don’t compare, 

Not so coony, but a little more than spoony. 
Talk about yo’ bears that Teddy Roosevelt shot, 
They couldn't class with what old San Francisco’s 
Listen, my honey, do, and I will show to you 
The dance of the grizzly bear. 


For the Guidance of Performers and Music Dealers 


Class E—Excellent 
Class G—Good 
Class M—Mediocre 


Class P—Poor 
Class A—Awful 
Class Z— Should be ignored 


Numbers Reviewed in this Issue, and their Classification 


CHORUS. 

Hug up close to your baby, 

Throw your shoulders t ward the ceilin’, 
Lawdy, Lawdy, what a feelin’! 

Snug up close to your lady, 

Close your eyes and do some nappin'. 
Something nice is gwine to happen! 

Hug up close to your baby. 

Sway me everywhere, 

Show your darlin’ beau Just how you go to Buffalo, 
Doin’ the grizzly bear. 


s sit down and rest a minute, honey, dear, 
head feels awful queer, please call the waiter near, 
water quick, the lady’s gone, I fear.” 

- ,- ■- — p ur se you’ll find some money, 

— i.— -- d 0 that dance. 


Thank you, honey, i 


D showed me 1 


Where'., .... , 

That put me in a trancer ru ta 
Now that I’ve got my breath, 
Come on with yo’ grizzly bear. 


Hug up close to your baby, 

Hypnotize me like a wizard, shake 
Snug up close to your lady, 

If they do that dance in heaven, 
at seven. 

Hug up close to your baby, 

Sway me everywhere. 

You and me is two. I’ll make it one w: 
Doin’ the grizzly bear. 


Just like a blizzard, 
me, hon’, tonight 

get through 


(Copyright, 1910, by Ted Snyder Company, Inc., New York.) 


“DON’T GIVE ME DIAMONDS, ALL I WANT IS YOU,” by Chas. K. Harris. 
Class—A. 

“OK, WHAT I’D DO TOR A GIRL LIKE YOU,” by Whiting and Snyder. 
Class—M. 

“I APOLOGIZE,” by Brockman and Fitzgibbon. 

Class—P. 

“WHEN MADAM TETRAZIN SINGS CIRIBIRIBIN,” by Harris and Robinson. 
Class—A. 

“PLAY THAT barber SHOP CHORD,” by Tracey and Muir. 

Class—E. 

“I’D RATHER SAY HELLO THAN SAY GOODBYE,” by Alfred Bryan and 
Helf. 

Class—E. 

“MY, BUT I’M LONGING POR LOVE,” by Feyson and Friedman. 

Class—M. 

“THE PASSION DANCE” (instrumental), by Leo Friedman. 

Class—E. 

“I WISH THAT YOU WAS MY GAL, MOLLY,” by Berlin and Snyder. 

Class—G. 

“MY SWEETHEART'S FAVORITE WALTZ (APTER THE BALL),” by Gil¬ 
lespie and Sherman. 

Class—P. 

“IN THE SPRING I’LL BRING A RING AROUND TO ROSIE,” by Harris 

and Robinson. 

Class—P. 

“GRIZZLY BEAR,” by Berlin and Botsford. 

Class—Z. 


JULIAN EDWARDS DEAD 



Julian Edwards, the composer, died 
on September 5 at his residence in Yon¬ 
kers, N. Y., of heart disease and com¬ 
plications, after an illness of about 
seven months. 

Mr. Edwards was one of the best 
known composers of opera and musical 
comedy music in the United States. 
He was born at Manchester, England, 
on December 11, 1855, in which city 
he also was educated. He was a stu¬ 
dent of music under Sir Herbert Oake- 
ley of Edinburgh, and Sir Edward Mac- 
farran of London. 

He composed several operettas which 
were produced in British provinces, and 
at one time was conductor of the Royal 
English Opera Company. 

He came to the United States in 1888, 
since which time his fame as a com¬ 
poser has steadily increased. His most 
successful grand operas were: “Vic¬ 
torian,” “Elfinella,” and “Corinne.” 
Light operas and musical comedies: 
"Jupiter,” “Friend Fritz,” “Goddess of 
Truth," “Brian Boru,” “Dolly Varden,” 
“The Belle of London Town,” "When 
Johnny Comes Marching Home,” "The 
Gay Musician.” 

Mr. Edwards was married in New 
York on January 9, 1889, to Philippine 
Diedle. 


THOUGHTS ON TITLES. 

Head Music Publishing Co.: "With- 
w he World Don,t Seem the 
iSthnr 2? agTee . wlth th e talented 
author, whoever he mav be, that the 
world certainly "do not.” 

Victor Kremer Personal: “The Angle 


Worm Wiggle.” To be done only 
hobble skirt. And who wants to w< 
hobble skirt. 

Jerome H. Remiclc & Co.: “Oh, 
Spearmint. Kiddo with the Wr: 
Eyes.” Sounds painfully, to cop a ph 
like our motion of nothing to hear 


“Oh, Death, where is thy sting!” 
Bring forth the smelling salts, the cam¬ 
phor, and the old reliable restoratives. 
We swoon, we grope, we falter, we gasp 
for breath. Charles K. Harris has gone 
back into the tombs of the ages, busted 
into the ancient cellar with a cold chisel 
and a mallet, and dragged out a shriv¬ 
eled, archaic mummy. 

"DON’T GIVE ME DIAMONDS, ALL 
I WANT IS YOU,” sets us tottering on 
our venerable pins. We plunged eagerly 
through the first six lines and then suf¬ 
fered a withering relapse. Our wife 
played the melody (brave little woman 
that she is!) with effect and eclat, but 
at the end of this period we pulled the 
stop watch on her, went to bed and— 
blew out the gas! 

In order that our readers may share 
with us the agony and the torture to 
which we have been subjected (the Lord 
forbid we should be prone to selfishness) 
we take the liberty of quoting the first 
six lines of this new doleful ballad of 
Mr. Harris’, with due respect for the 
copyright notice and all it may imply: 

"The brownstone mansion glittered 
with a thousand beams of light. 
The husband stood beside the open 
door; 

‘I’m going to the club,’ he said, ‘I’ll 
not be home tonight, 

Here’s something that I brought you 
from the store.’ 

He took a diamond necklace from the 
pocket of his coat* 

And save it to the woman he had 

Then the song goes on to unfold a 
tale of sorrow and marital negligence 
which is Just simply awful to even think 
of. The noble wife “shudders in the 
cold” and applies the title. It seems, 
however, the brute listened not unto 
her supplications, for we find him, in the 
second act, a whole year having elapsed, 
sitting alone, “in sorrow that no mor- 


mutation meal ticket. “She’s hap-pier,” 
(two notes) we learn, "in that home 
from which there’s no return.” 

Oh, dry those^ tears and return^ to^the 

t the dimunds with 


3 music. (Ted Snyder Co., Inc.) 

James Brockman and Bert Fitzgib¬ 
bon are responsible for “I APOLOGIZE," 
(M. Witmark & Sons). Jim and Bert 


dered a little money. We'd like -- — 
something kind about the ditty, but we 
can’t. We apologize. 

“WHEN MADAM TETRAZIN SINGS 
CIRIBIRIBIN,” by Will J. Harris and 
Harry I. Robinson, is an awful, awful 
thing. The writers have wasted all the 
time that should be devoted to this 
“song.” We conserve ours. (Will Ros- 
siter, publisher.) 


Leo Friedman, who has in the past 
given us some excellent compositions, 
and whose work, so far as we now can 
remember, has been free from the taint 
of plagiarism, has in “MY, BUT I’M 
LONGING FOR LOVE,” lifted not a lit- 






















12 


THE SHOW WO RL D 


10, 1910. 


DOC WADDELL ™ PASSING SHOW 

Opinions and Current Amusement News from the Veteran Circus 
Press Agent Now Living in Columbus, Ohio 




























September 10, 1910. 


THE SHOW WORLD 


13 


THE THROBBING THROTTLE 


ADDRESS ALL CHECKS, theat¬ 
rical passes, and things worth while 
to the Editor; all manuscripts should 
be sent to the office-boy. 


I 


A WEEKLY SAFETY-VALVE REGISTER OF THE PULSE-STEAM OF 
DAILY DOIN’S THAT MAKE THE WORLD OF SHOW GO ’ROUND 

J. CASPER NATHAN, Editor 


] 


S WEEK’S NEWS LAST WEEK 


OFFICE—WHEREVER THE EDITOR SEES A TYPEWRITER 


“BOW TO NOBODY; BOW-WOW TO EVERYBODY’ 











































14 


THE SHOW WORLD 


FIELD OF STAGE MUSIC 



































































n oo c to™ oo 


September 10, 1910. 


THE SHOW WORLD 


lfl 



* THE GREATJl 


QSS5£HK 


TREASURE!? 

































































16 


THE SHOW WORLD 


GbbCo^-JUh) s 



MISTER BILLY LANG 

SHUFFLED INTO DISCARDS 


Another “White Man’s Hope” [Going the Way from Which None Come Back- 
Current Sports by One of the Country’s Foremost Authorities. 






















September 10, 1910. 


THE SHOW WORLD 


17 


BASEBALL REMINISCENCES 
OF “OLDEST IN CAPTIVITY” 

A Yam of the National Game As It Used To Be Played Narrated for Show World Readers 
and Retold and Refurbished “By Jeb” 


N any other line of business, a per¬ 
son making: as many errors as had 
Comiskey during the past year. 


vould b 




... charge of the effects. Even 
in the baseball business, formerly called 
"sport,” very few citizens patronize 
a club in seventh place and "going 

down." 

Why is it then that the White Sox 
drew such large crowds in the face of 
continual defeats, and after winning a 
few games were on Sunday, August 14, 
greeted by the largest number of paid 
admissions in the history of the game? 
One reason is, that they have been play¬ 
ing good, consistent, but unlucky ball, 
just as good to witness from an exhibi¬ 
tion standpoint as though they were near 
the top of the percentage column. 

The new grounds, with the splendid 
appointments also cut considerable 
figure, but the great drawing card is 
Comisky’s personal popularity. The pub- 

id’Ts'still trying. 

.. _.... _ also shed the 

"White Sox Rooters Association," 
which was quite a handicap for a while, 
and the relegation of that organization 
to the oblivion from which it should 

great refief to the "old Roman.” 


■ of a 


Old T 


while a 


pitching. 1 


1 the n 


:he national 
since Chad- 

wicks aeain, I am the most ancient fol¬ 
lower of the game now in captivity. In 
fact, an old friend of mine who migrated 
to a Pacific coast state many years 
ago, and whom I ante-date but a short 
time In baseball, sent me a notice of 
Chadwick's death and wrote: It is all 
off now; you are IT. There may be a 
number of people who date back further 
than myself, but I don't believe many 
of them are now paying $.75 for a seat 
in the grandstand. 

"What else is there to go and see? 
That is what a friend asked me as we 
were filing out of the gate after the 
last game at the old Comiskey grounds. 
I told him there was cricket, golf, 
chess, yachting. La Crosse, Winona,— 
and then some stranger in the rear 
laughed right out, just as though he 
meant it 

Johnny Ward’s Sebnt as a Golfer. 

"A few years since when John Ward 
first began to shine in the golf world, 
and had been the subject of a news¬ 
paper article which stated that Spauld¬ 
ing had advised him to play golf for 
his health, I met John and asked him 
how much Spaulding got out of it. Oh, he 
says. I bought my outfit at his store, but 
we never had exchanged a word on the 
subject Asked if playing golf was on 
the square with him or taken up through 
-"~e ulterior motive, he replied: You 


n the square and I like the 


bet it_ 

game. Why, when one gets so he is 
afraid to stand up to the plate, and 
slide into the bases, what else is there 
to do in an athletic way? While on 


11 v » mil tun wun me nome 

While sitting in the hotel office 
chatting with local players one of them 
came up to pair, them off. When he 
came to our poorest player, he said: 
1 guess we will put him against Mr. 


It was my good fortune to attend the 
last Boston game in the company of 
an old timer, who has been attending 
and playing games ever since 1865— 
Count’em, forty-five years. “Yes," says 
he, in relating his experiences, "I started 
in at Brooklyn watching the old At- 
lantlcs and Eckfords of that place, and 
the Mutuals of New York in a number 
of contests, of which my principal re¬ 
membrance was the betting. A certain 
part of the stand was occupied by gamb¬ 
lers and bets were openly made every 
time there was a batter up, as to wheth¬ 
er he would reach first base, and there 
were also any number of side issues 
on which bets were continually offered, 
having a tendency to kill the game in its 
Infancy. 

This was all vacant property around 
here then and many a time I have gone 
out and practiced with the old Excelsiors 
on the Camp Douglas grounds—a big 
open prairie—I presume about where 
Douglass place is now located. Johny 
and Woody Stearns, sons of a South Wa¬ 
ter street Commission merchant, played 
the catcher and short stop positions, 
named McNally did hkf 


V.—who was an elderly man, and prob¬ 
ably cannot play very well. 

"Elderly man,” says I. “Why, I played 
ball against him years ago. He is no 
older than myself, and I am too young 
to commence playing golf.” Say, that 
elderly man did grate. Sounded to m« 
like a tall, gray whiskered man in a 
Prince Albert, wearing a silk hat and 
a cane. Well, the elderly gentleman 
defeated his man, made the best score 
of the bunch and afterwards won the 
championship of the state, which he 
holds to this day. But what has this to 
do with baseball? 

“Yes, I helped close the show at the 
old grounds, and in that respect was 
more loyal than Comiskey himself. Was 
told that he was busy superintending 
the work at the new grounds. Had a 
great curosity to see him at work, so 
walked up there and found him tne cen¬ 
ter of an admiring throng, with appar¬ 
ently not a care in the world, while but 
a few rods away was poor old Anse 
all by his lonesomeness- '■Vjj *“ | 

will touch’ upon it. 

Lots of Luck in Batting 

“Apropos of Meloan's recent flight 
to the select circle of batting Phenoms, 
it might not be out of place to state 
that there are good batters and poor 
batters, but the best of them take 
their rides in the elevator just the same. 
In other words, luck is a great factor 
in the batting percentages of any player. 
Mike Mitchell of the Cincinnati’s has 
a full appreciation of the conditions, and 
in a recent interview states that the 
reason he stood away up among the 
best batters one season and took a slump 
the next, was owing to the fact that 
when his percentage was high, he was 
hitting them between the fielders and 


a the moral 


'hen it v 
t them. 


s low, t 
As far a 


,s hitting straight 


another. Mike, who is naturally of a 
modest disposition, one time, while 
playing with the Portland, Oregon club 
in a close game, with men on the bases 
and great things expected of him, struck 
out. On his return from the plate to 
the bench some fan asked him why he 
didn’t hit it out, and Mike replied: 
The pitcher wouldn’t let me. And yet 
one continually reads about the batter 
placing his hits etc., when as a matter 
of fact, he is fortunate to hit the ball 
hard in any direction, especially in the 
pinches, with men on the bases and a 
run needed to tie it up or win. The 
pitcher Is a very busy man just at that 


particular time. , 

“Last season at about this time, when 
the New Yorks defeated the Cubs four 
straight games on the west side grounds, 
I attended a couple of them in company 
of an" old friend, with whom I played 
ball forty-three years ago. That is, 
we played together once—and that was 
enough for me. We worked in a rail¬ 
road office and at the noon hour went 
out on the track to play catch. His am¬ 
bition was not as much to be a ball 
player as a physical giant, and to show 
me his strength, he kept throwing them 
over my head. The last one went so 
far down the track that the retrieving 
took up the balance of the hour—and 
never again for me. Speaking about 
these games; in one of them the New 
Yorks made five or six runs in the first 
inning and while commenting to ray 
friend on their luck, a prosperous look¬ 
ing middle-aged stranger, on the other 
side of me spoke up: Pardon me; T 
couldn’t help but hear your remarks, 
and while I consider myself something 
of a fan. your information is certainly 
new to me. Would it be presuming too 
much in asking you to explain the sit¬ 
uation to me? After satisfying my¬ 
self that I was not being kidded. I told 
him that every ball hit that inning, ex¬ 
cept the last one, was a clean base hit. 
Two of them struck out and there were 
no other chances to field the ball. The 
Cubs got men on first and second with 
one out and the hardest .hit so far. a 
liner over short, was caught on the 
jump in one hand, and tossed to second 


it had been six 

. __would have come 

possibly on third. Now 


for a double play, 
inches higher ‘ 

we will see what the New Yorks will do 
this time; perhaps they will knock the 
ball right at the fielders. There you 
are; the first three batsmen knocked 
grounders directly at Evers. But the 
game was lost In the first inning. 

Sensational Catches Bare. 

“I’ve read so much about inside base¬ 
ball, players stabbing the balls, rob¬ 


bing others of base hits, etc., etc. I 
don’t see how a person can stab a ball 
with a big glove or mitt any more than 
one could stab a fish with a net, and this 
robbing business certainly makes me 
laugh. No one executes impossible plays, 
and high salaried players are certainly 
expected to handle any ball they can 
reach, in a majority of instances at least. 
As a matter of fact in the eight or ten 
major league games I have attended 
this season, I have failed to see an ex¬ 
traordinary stop or catch, but have 
seen batters credited with base hits, 
that, in my opinion, should have been 
charged up to the fielders as errors. In 
a Chicago Sunday paper a few weeks 
since was a write-up of the old Frank¬ 
lins of Chicago. I remember seeing that 
club play on the fair grounds in a city 
not far from Chicago in the early 70’s. 
The grounds were large enough for a 
half dozen games and nothing to in¬ 
terfere with fielders. The home club’s 
premier batsman used a bat evidently 
turned from a miniature telegraph pole, 
and when he swung and landed on one 
of the low ones it was a sprint for the 
fielder no matter how far out he played. 
Well, Hallinan was in left field for the 
Franklins and when this Hercules came 
to bat the second time, he took his posi¬ 
tion farther out than he could get on 
the inside of Comiskey’s new grounds, 
and at the crack of the bat, turned and 
ran at top speed with the ball, and 
caught it over his shoulder with one arm 
extended to full length, in his bare hand 
of course—nothing else doing in those 
days. It was the longest and highest 
hit that I ever saw made, and I have 
never seen a better catch of a fly ball. 

Catcher Flint’s Geography. 

“A friend of mine in Minnesota at¬ 
tended many games with me down on the 
lake front in the late 70’s. He used to 
get as much fun out of it as he could, 
as he said he would read about the 
t morning papers. One 


day Flint, bare handed, reached 
caught what would have been 
pitch. The play naturally 


wild 

- accorded 

friend turned 


great applai 

around and asked _ _ —_ 

ter. One enthusiast answered excitedly: 
Why. dldn’’ 


__ — that catch of 

Flint’s? Yes, certainly, but I didn’t 
anything to get excited ove * 


i his 
the 


■OHM_ That 

_ paid for doing, isn’t it? 

Any one can catch them right over the 
plate. And this reminds me of an¬ 
other one in which this party and Flint 
were concerned. It was before Flint 
broke into the league and was living 
in St. Louis. My friend wanted a catcher, 
heard of him, wrote for his terms, and 
Flint answered by wire: Seventy-five 
dollars a month. Where is Minnesota? 
I don’t know how that will go now, but 
about the time Flint had become a cele¬ 
brity, I sent the item to the Chicago 
Sunday Tribune. It was copied in the 
Clipper and republished in the Tribune, 
the Clipper receiving credit for the item, 
which reminds me of another. This friend 
was a passenger conductor, and on 

run, members of the club were a 
depot with a request for him to con¬ 
tinue on to Chicago and secure a catcher. 
He heard of Bill Phillips and was told 
he could probably be found on the west 
side prairie at some special place where 
his crowd played. My friend went out 
in a hack, and when he alighted, dress¬ 
ed in his conductors’ uniform and In¬ 
quired for Phillips, ’broke up the game. 
The word was passed down the line and 
finally some one said Phillips was not 
there. At the same time he noticed a 
fellow skulking off in the distance, and 
being as quick witted a man as I ever 
have met, he sized up the situation and 
said: Here, boys, I am no police offi¬ 
cer. I don’t want Phillips for any crime. 
I am a railroad conductor and came 
away in a hurry in my uniform. Am 

manager of the W- Minn, ball club 

and want to give Phillips a job as 
catcher. He gained their confidence, 
the skulker got the office to retrace, and 
he left the city that night to start a 
ball career that ended in the Cleveland 
National league, where he played first 


_ _ _ best baseball reporters. I 

found an account of a play like this: 
Man on second and first. Man going to 
bat—was advised by manager to bunt 
toward third. Pitcher surmised just 
what he was going to do. went over and 
told the third baseman not to leave his 
base and when the catcher (who was 



Mrs. Al. Copelan, whose husband is the 
able pianist at the White City ball room, 
is at her home, 307 East Fifty-fourth 
street, suffering from severe burns which 
she sustained when a gas stove in her 
flat exploded. While Mrs. Copelan’s 
burns are painful they are not considered 
of a particularly serious nature. 


not on) signaled for a certain ball, the 
pitcher signalled back no, the man was 
going to bunt and he would give him 
a different one. So as he pitched the 
ball, he ran right over where he knew 
it was coming, picked it up, threw to 
third and from there to first for a double 
play. Talk about pre-science—that was 
calling the turn for fair. As Ty Cobb 
was the batter mentioned, it seems as 
though they would have had time to 
throw it to second and complete a triple 
play. 

“But Peck Sharp beat this a long 
ways. We attended a New York-Cub 
game two years ago, and we were both 
They were playing 


a talkative n 


along inning after inning, neither side 
scoring, and nothing to indicate that a 
run ever would be made. Tinker came 
to bat about the sixth and Peck said: 
‘I’ll bet you five dollars that he makes 
a three-base hit, and I’ll tell you just 
where it is going; it is going to be a 
right over second and go right 
" :he cente- *- 

e object in bringing ___ _ 

-e. You and Tinker have got the 

thing all put up and expect to divide 
riMi-" T „, ~ ou • Then bang. 


11 fool y__. __ 

within an inch of 
would, and Tinker 
the only r 


arid the _ .. 

Where Peck said 

the game. Wonder what the 

people in hearing range of _ _ 

versation thought of that prediction. 
As Tinker rounded third base, Zimmer¬ 
man, who was coaching, grabbed him 
and pushed him back towards third. 
When Tinker located the ball, he turned, 
dodged Zimmerman and made the plate 
easily. Zim was roundly hissed by the 
spectators in that vicinity and his ac¬ 
tions were certainly a mystery to me 
until Sharpe explained it all after we 
left the grounds.” 

Now that the Detroit club is appar¬ 
ently put out of the championship race 
it will need a stronger attraction than 
Ty Cobb to draw crowds at home dur¬ 
ing the balance of the season. 

Ban Johnson didn’t do much to Joe 
Cantlllon after all. Joe must feel much 
better as manager and part owner of a 
club leading in the American Association 
race and drawing big crowds, than man¬ 
ager of a tail-end club in the American 

The efforts of Choynski and others to 
induce Jeffries to again “come back” re¬ 
minds me of a story Frank Bush told, 
quite a number of years ago. A man 
crossing the street stumbled and fell un¬ 
der a wagon, as the rear wheel was pass¬ 
ing over him, the driver yelled. “look 
out.” Of course it was all over by that 
time, and the man on the ground ex¬ 
claimed, "Good God; are you coming 


ANSWERS TO OOBBESPONDENTS. 

Cy-trus—No one even told us that 
Comiskey had bought an orchard. If 
you think he needs any lemons you 
might suggest that he buy the player 
by that name, but if you approach him 
personally you had better go in a cage. 

Pug—We have no idea how much it 
cost the public via Jeffries to entertain 
that “one happy family” at the training 
camp while Jeffries was fishing. 


MT SfTEINSMAKE ISP NEW ...!?„ R ,!‘„ C,TV 

I* *• Xj.M^®^t4BSOLUTEirGUARANTEED. SELLING AGENTS 















THE SHOW WORLD 


AFTER 

YOUR 

PERFORMANCE 


Take a Turkish Bath and a Plunge 

ALL FOR ONE DOLLAR 

WH S^aJ~ NEW NORTHERN BATHS ^CHICAGO*"’ 

(Sylvester J. Simon, Pres.) 


THEN ENJOY 
A NIGHT’S 
REPOSE 



Don’t let old Gen. Flimco 

shake you down for two bones a 

week or anything else! He is laughing 
openly and brazenly at every exhibitor who 

is enough of a soft mark to stand for such a hold-up 
and shake-down. If you got anything for the money 
it would be all right. But what do you get? Protec¬ 
tion? Don’t be absurd! You are less protected in his hands 
than anvwhere else on God’s green footstool. Better films? If 


UNDER THE WHITE-TOPS 

Where Your Circus and Carnival Friends are to 
Found in the Near Future 



CARNIVAL ROUTES 

































September 30, 1910. 


THE SHOW WORLD 


19 


FRED MA CE’S S PLATTER 

Happenings Among the Throngs That Crowd the Great 
White Way. 


1 New York, Sept. 7.—"Madame Sherry” 
I, a big hit; looks as if it would run 
the season. Every paper grave it great 
Sotices. Elizabeth Murray hobbled 
through and made good. The whole 
,how was a riot from start to finish. 

Prazee & Lederer have opened offices 
in the new building next to the Lyceum 
theater on West Forty-fifth street. Now 
that they have “Madame Sherry" on the 
road, to success they will bend all ef¬ 
forts to the new Victor Moore show 
which started rehearsals Monday. Good 
cast engaged and, I hear, a great book. 

lew Morton Is now the general stage 
director for Daniel V. Arthur. He " 

r - bbu i-> e w 0 if Hopper show wh‘ 

bury Park Labor Day < 

--Marie Cahill piece in 

hearsal. Lew told me he had for the 
Cahill show the greatest singing chorus 
ever put on in musical comedy. Some 
of the chorus people are getting sixty 
dollars a week. That’s traveling, 


weeks. John Park, Frank Lalor, and 
ithers are with the company. 

Clarence Kolb, of Kolb & Dill, told me 
lie real story about the spilt up between 
tim and Dill. It was all caused by a 
difference of opinion over Nate Magner, 
their manager. Kolb told Magner he 
was through after the season closed in 
San Francisco. Magner found Dill had 
fcitten oft more than he could chew in a 
little building scheme where he was put¬ 
ting up sixteen bungalows at Alameda, 
•ill. Magner offered to stake Dill to the 
necessary ready coin of the realm if he, 
3)111, would insist on retaining Magner 
|ts manager. Dill concluded this was 
best and so decided. Kolb pleaded with 
Dill and told him he would see his mis¬ 
take too late, all to no avail. It was 
then Kolb’s turn to get sore just as 
Dill was beginning to see the folly of 
the thing and before Kolb left for New 
fork, Dill almost begged him to forget 
l^and^start the season. Then how- 

take whatever was offered_ __ 

It on good authority that the Shuberts 
mil present Kolb and Max Rogers, late 
of Rogers Brothers, as a German comedy 

Times Square Hotel. Here Is one of 
the greatest places in New York to meet 
your friends. It reminds one of the 
Sherman House in its palmy days. N. 
Xewgold (not an Irishman) is the pro¬ 
prietor, and take it from me, he knows 
now to handle the patrons. Some of the 
♦audeyifle ac tor s that live at this hotel 
oon t leave their rooms when they book 
their act. The United Booking office 
5 right across the street and whenever 
Martin Beck wants an act he just raises 
his window and hollers over to the 
Times Square Hotel. (I don’t get any¬ 
thing for the above, ask Newgold.) 

Bessie Jane Mackay, a young lady 


from Milwaukee, will make her stage 
debut with one of the Shubert produc¬ 
tions this season. Bessie has been an 
amateur entertainer in the City of Beer 
for the last two years. 

Fields’ Wintergarten. Lew Fields is 
rushing work on his new winter garden. 
It is located at Fiftieth and Broadway. 
It will be devoted to the old style Weber 
& Field shows. I think it will be a 
knockout from the start. 

Hippodrome opened last Saturday and 
they certainly have some show. I 
thought last year’s show was the limit 
for indoor attractions, but I certainly’ 
had my eyes opened with this year’s 
spectacle. R. H. Burnside wrote the 
piece and, as usual, Manuel Klein com¬ 
posed the music and he has at least two 
big song hits. Too bad Chicago hasn’t 
a hippodrome so as to get the benefit 
of these wonderful shows. 

“Robinson’s Girls” is an excellent 
Burly Q show. I saw it the other night 
at the Murray hill theater. Robinson 
is funny from start to finish. Miss Ida 
Emerson looks more stunning than ever. 
I venture to say there is not another 
woman in burlesque that looks as well 
as she. The olio consisted of Lew Pal¬ 
mer, Barrett & Bell, Charles Robinson, 
Emerson & Hills, and Allen & Clark. It 
is a corking good show. 

“Our Miss Gibbs,” Frohman’s new 
piece, is rather pretty, but hardy funny 
eough for an American audience. I can 
very well see how it has run for over 
a year in London for I spent more than 
a year there myself; it is typically Eng¬ 
lish through and through. Bert Leslie 
struggles hard with his part and is the 
best thing in it. Miss Julia Sanderson 
replaces Pauline Chase Monday. 

Fred Hornby is playing the part of 
“Old Doctor Grindle” in the De Wolf 
Hopper show this season. Applause is 
old to him so I will clap on the lid now. 
Fred is immense. Ask Georgle Mack 
or Bob Graham. 

E. z. Mark Pollock, stage manager who 
lost $2,500 playing the races this sum¬ 
mer, just returned from Cincinnati 
whither he went to teach some mer¬ 
maids how to duck in and out of the 
diving bells in the water carnival which 
is in connection with the great fall festi¬ 
val being held there now. Pollock 
brought back one of the best colds ever 
contracted, with no two weeks clause. 

Soldier Tom Wilson starts a black 
face act next week on the Poll time. 
Tom has a partner, and from the way 
he described the act to me, I would give 
him forty weeks without seeing it. 

Bonnie Clark, at present one of the 
dancers with “The Echo.” has signed a 
five-year contract with Park & Tilford, 
purveyors of high class goods. Bonnie 
will do a twist dance in an olive bottle. 
She needs another girl for a sister act, 
I will try hard if I can “to-mate-her.” 
(And the boat sails Wednesday.) 

Wanted any good job paying four hun¬ 
dred or more a week. Apply first in¬ 
stance Fred Mace, this office. 


HAVE TILT WITH NEWSPAPERS 


Company Playing Louisville Masonic Make Capital of ] 
Account 


d Advertising 


; Louisville, Ky„ Sept. 7.—Those of us 
: w „ h0 are interested in things theatrical 
nere, were quite wrought up over an 
; announcement which appeared on a 
card prominently displayed in some of 
*!!L?®? olpal business houses in the 
. retail business houses in the retail dis- 
nct last week. It read something like 
s .pAynounceinent, The Courier- 
Journal. Times and Herald refuse in 
??L way v, t0 . advertise 'Brown of Har- 
i a / K a which opens the Masonic on 
. ^or Day. ” Some of us. who were 
•: ...™ , realized that it was the work of 
■ v - Burton, the hustling man- 

?S r . ot the Lytell-Vaughan Company, 
, nieh will open the Masonic Monday. 
It seems that neither of the three pa- 
frl™ wou'd accept cash for advertising 
Burton, because The Boston 
2“*. Company, who had the 
I ?5 lc l ast season, owed them $1,600 

s , n ”- The Press were under 
impression that the Shuberts had 
' the theater last 

j that the y were the debtors, 
argument. Now everything is 
Vhat y ttS? IL 1 ttle papers understand 
asent« h f„. S i ub ?> rts were ° nl y booking 
t?r the Boston Amusement Com- 
hoSL w-had no direet control of the 
a Dinor o t0n ’ how ever, published 

Vthe tefl ® e Ptember 5, giving all 
therpwi?, i 1 "/? many figures. He told 
•hat^ re “fW lv# of T he Show World 
»ei h ® ,w°u>a set out a paper every 
'•» the U daiiy h paS d get ^Presentation 

: SK'S’te.TfSa; 

^llw'rS The , Consolidated Bill 
Ihr R?.*„ omp . any also has a claim on 
they, too"r < .ful"n 6n i cnt . Company and 
*°rk for «?£<£? v to do an y display 
they Win fnil’ow Shuberts. Most likelv 
. • will follow the policy of the papers 


and give the Lytell-Vaughan aggrega- 

The new Walnut Street theater 
opened its doors to the public last 
Monday evening with vaudeville, and 
the performance pleased two crowded 
houses. The first performance was at 
7:30 with a second at 9:15. Charles 
Dobbs, formerly dramatic editor of the 
Herald, made the opening address stat¬ 
ing the policy of the management and 
their hope for the success of the en¬ 
terprise. The new theater is the safest 
and handsomest amusement house in 
the city. Beside being architecturally 
good looking, it is absolutely fire proof, 
being entirely constructed of steel and 
re-inforced concrete. The seating 
capacity is estimated at 1,200 which in¬ 
cludes the lower or main floor, a 
mezzanine, composed of private boxes, 
a balcony, and proscenium boxes. 
There are five main exits on each floor, 
not including the main exit into a lobby 
fifteen feet wide and forty-three feet 
long. The stage < is thirty-two feet 
deep and seventy-six feet six inches 
wide. All of the scenery is hoisted, 
lowered, and shifted by a patented elec¬ 
trical apparatus on the “prop" side of 
the stage. The dressing rooms, eight 
in number, are below the stage, as are 
the rooms for the orchestra, a large 
chorus, and trunks. There are showers 
for men and women. The Walnut 
Street Amusement Company, which 
owns the house, is composed of foreign 
and local capitalists who have put 
John Ward, of Hamilton, Ohio, in 

The National Vaudeville Association 
books the attractions. After the suc¬ 
cessful opening of the new theater a 
banquet was held in the Rathskeller of 
the Seelbach hotel, given by the man¬ 
agement. John E. McCarthy, president 
of the association, acted as toast 


Best Show Towns West 

ARE LOCATED ON 

Rock Island Lines 

Hundreds of important centers in the Central 
West and Southwest are well ^served by Rock 
Island Lines. They arejlocated [i;n a 
producing section, which is ideal from the 
box office viewpoint. 

Information relative to any town or section served 
by these lines on request. 

L. M. ALLEN 

Passenger Traffic Manager 
CHICAGO 



Streetmen Fair workers Agents 

The Great Money-Maker. Sells like hot cakes 
at $1.00 each. Costs agents only $2.70 doz. 



Also write for Ma 
ations, costing agen 


, „ J* of five 25c high grade Toilet Prepar- 

’“PARKER CHEMICAL COMPA^De^t! S., Chicago, Bis. 


master. Speeches were made by Ben¬ 
jamin Strauss, Hamilton, Ohio; John 
T. Ward; Gus Sun, of Springfield, 
Ohio; O. M. Bake, of Miami, Ohio; Al¬ 
bert Rteutlinger, and Charles Dobbs. 
The Walnut Street theater will have 
three shows daily, with prices at ten 
and twenty cents, all over the house 
with the exception of the boxes which 
will sell at twenty-five cents. Harry 
Batts, a Louisville youngster and a 
capable performer on the violin, will 
direct the orchestra. 


Hjp jgjggi 

Improved Acetylene for Tents, 
Circuses, Parke, etc. 

THE ALEXANDER MILBURN CO 

507 W. Lombard St. Baltimore, Md. 




























mm wm wvww mmm mmm mm 


20 


THE SHOW WORLD 


WHEN WAS THAT FILM RELEASED? 


Licensed Films. Independent Films 












































































































































































September 10, 1910. THE SHOW WORLD 21 

- 


IMP--BISOX-DEFENDER-ATLAS-OWL-AMBROS1Q 

Cincinnati Film Exchange 

318*317 West Fourth Street CINCINNATI, O. Long Distance Phone, Main 1-9SO 

“The House That Buys Films” 

Connect with a real live, up-to-date Film Exchange that can give you a real service 

References—MOTION PICTURE DISTRIBUTING & SALES CO. 

ITALA-THANHOUSEK-PlhM D’AWT-VAXKEE-OTHERS 


MIX-UP IN MANAGERS 
AT M0NTG0M0RY, ALA. 

“McFadden’s Flats” Company Arrived to Play the Town But 
House is Not Open. 


Montgomery, Ala., Sept. 7.—The 
Grand Theater of this city had put out 
' paper for "McFadden’s Flats” to appear 
last Thursday. Jake Wells had not 
sent in a house manager, neither had 
he made any announcement as to who 
1 lie would be, although many rumors 
had been heard in connection with the 
managers’ job. 

- Daniel. Mack and his company of 
{ thirty-five, with full set of scenery for 
the “Flats,” came in from Macon and 
I When Mr. Mack went to the theater he 
was surprised to find it closed and no 
one around but the Janitor. It was 
explained to Mack that no manager had 
reported for the house, and that the 
agent for his company had left paper 
in the theater and the paper was 
turned over to Eddie Foster, the man 
who has had charge of the bill posting 
for the theater for the past two years. 
Foster called up Cardoza In Atlanta, 
explaining the situation, and asked 
what to do with the paper. Cardoza 
told him to put It up, but said he did 
not know anything about the attrac- 


teferred him to Jake Wells, New York 
City. Mr. Wells wired that the attrac- 
, don had been cancelled for the past 
) three weeks and that It was not to be 
put on. Mack was very much put out 
over the situation, claiming to have 
never been notified that the show had 
been cancelled. The "Flats” left for 
Scranton, Miss. 

Paper was received for the "Graus- 
tark” Company to appear at the Grand 
on the 7th. As no manager had shown 
up. the paper was not put up. It is 
stated that Wells has announced that 
the house will open either September 
15 or September 22. 

Information has been received that 
Corbin Shields, the newly appointed 
manager for the house, has refused to 
come to this city, and that Jack 
loungs will come to take charge of 
the Wells’ interest. Mr. Youngs is a 
capable man and very popular in Mont¬ 
gomery, as he has been connected with 
many amusement enterprises in this 


dty. 


Vaudeville for Colored Polka 

Ewing Taylor has opened the Queen 
theater in Montgomery. This theater 
is devoted exclusively to colored vaude¬ 
ville. Besides running two sister 
teams, the theater puts on two come¬ 
dians and motion pictures, thus making 
five acts. One night out of each week 
is devoted to wrestling and boxing 
matches. 

For the opening show Mr. Taylor se¬ 
cured a six-round bout between a local 
negro named Steveson, who held the 
undefeated championship of the state, 
and a negro named Jose, whose home is 
In the southern part of the state. 
Steveson got the fight, as he got four 
of the six rounds. 

This theater was intended for colored 
people only, but on the nights that 
these fights are put on the colored are 
eliminated in order that room may be 
made for the whites. Mr. Taylor has 
negotiations on with professional prize 
fighters of Chicago and hopes to have 
some important announcement to make 
soon in regard to his popular house. 

The chief of police and his assistant 
witnessed the first fight and no move 
was made to stop it, so the city or 
state authorities will make no efforts to 
stop this form of entertainment unless 
complaints are made to them in the 
proper manner. 

The Majestic Stock Company headed 
by William H. Starkey, will give way 
on September 10 for the theater to re¬ 
turn to the regular vaudeville Reason. 
The Majestic Stock has run from May 
8 to September 10, and there has been 
but few changes made in the entire 
cast of twelve during the run. 

W. K. Couch will continue as man¬ 
ager of this popular house and has 
announced that J. N. G. Fisher will re¬ 
turn to take charge of the box office, 
and E. R. Poundstone will have charge 
of the doors. The manager of the 
stage has not been announced as yet, 
neither has the orchestra, owing to the 
fact that Prof. Williams is now out of 
the city, and Mr. Couch has not been 
notified how many men has already 
been engaged for the orchestra for the 
season 1910-J1. 

The Interstate Amusement Company, 
of Chicago will again book the house 
and will furnish five vaudeville acts. 
The pictures that will be run are the 
“Imps” exclusively. 


DRAMATIC DOINGS 

Sed Deschane left Chicago recently to 
go in advance of Harry Scott’s "The 
Wizard of Wiseland,” which opens the 
season September 4 at Waukegan, Ill. 
Deschane is devoting much of his space 
to Nat Phillips, the principal comedian 
of the organization, who is said to be 
unusually clever. 

I. S. Potts left Battle Creek, Mich., 
this week to go in advance, of A1 W. 
Martin’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” During 
the summer he has been deputy su- 
Ti ., preme organizer of the Loyal Order of 

ine Kobisons are Minneapolis products Moose, and has succeeded in building 

no are fggg — - ° up a wonderful membership in Michigan. 

It takes a showman to make anything 


FABK EMPLOYES TO 

PRESENT MUSICAL SHOW 

Minneapolis, Minn.. Aug. 31.—Wonder- 
‘S' 6 Twln Cities’ big amusement 
park, closes its present season Septem¬ 
ber iz and on the evening of that date 
tne employes will present a musical 
comedy entitled “Echoes of Wonder- 
wh!ch h as been written, 
u.f n’ arK !, produced by Bobbie and 
Hazelle Robison, performers who have 
#nmml ery popular at the Airdome this 


.„y“ ‘woisuns are Minneapolis products 

c"nafd?ne 8 0 t 0 |me 0 ° P6n ° n the S ulllvan & 

A- WEATHERSTON MANAGER 

OP TWO THEATERS 

1 w23K!L Pa, l* Minn - Aug. 31.—E. A. 

iL-f-rno-, 6t< * n tlas acepted the local man- 
hv ° f m 1 ® , Lyceum theater in this 
th/ also act as manager of 

hous« £L eton ’, N ’ D - theater, both 
r 'eased by Messrs Walker 

hi theatrical season opens 

5 ,.. i c i ty Monday evening, September 
of the*Itan c h." eSentnt 0n of the “ Flower 


Dwight Pepple, of Toledo, a well 
known agent, met Marie Jordan at Win¬ 
ona, Minn., last December and did not 
see her until a week or so ago at In¬ 
dianapolis when the two were united 
in marriage. Miss Jordan is with “The 
Wife Tamers,” which is now at the 
Princess theater in Chicago. 

“The Goddess of Liberty” opened its 
regular season at Waukegan, Ill., this 
week. The show previously played one 
week at Milwaukee. 

"Miss Nobody From Starland” opened 
the season Thursday night at Joliet, Ill. 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF 


Wire-Walkers’ Oil-Paper and Silk Umbrellas 

Also theatre souvenirs. Sample souvenir sent post-paid 
receipt of 25c. Write for prices—Umbrellas. 

W. A. MENTZER, Importer Japanese Goods 


92-94 LAKE STREET, CHICAGO 




Over 76 per cent, of the fine*t theatre* in the United Statei and 
Canada ara furniihed with them. They are used in 818 of the 406 
moving picture theatre* in Chicago. 

To meat tba growing demand for 
LOW PRICED OPERA CHAIRS 


w* have originated a number of atylea which, tbeagh Inexpen¬ 
sive, are characteristic of 

ANDREWS QUALITY 


11 guide you when contemplating the purchaae 




• The Leading Journal 

I HP IlinCPntlP of the Moving Picture 

A HC LllUOl/U|iC business in Europe. 

Has the largest circulation and is the best Advertising Medium, bar none 

Subscription, $2.00 a Year. Sample Copy Mailed Free. 

31,33 and 36 Litchfield St., LONDON, W.C., ENGLAND 


Shortage of fully 10.000 

. __■ “wireless” developments. 

on of Telegraph Officials and positively 

_ __ _ Write for catalogue. MATT. TELE- 

feitAPM I AST.. Cincinnati. Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la. 
Columbia, H. C., Portland, Ore. 


HOT TIMES IN TEXAS 

WITH WARRING CIRCUSES 

The advance forces of the circus or¬ 
ganizations about to invade Texas are 
waging a fierce battle. Every available 
inch of billboard space in the Texas 
cities contracted is being utilized by the 
opposing factions and fortunes will be 
spent before the campaign is concluded. 
The circus trust is putting up a des¬ 
perate fight and the result of its combat 
with the Sells-Floto aggregation will be 
awaited with considerable interest. 


Folding and Assembly Chairs 


To Manage Big McConnell Show. 

Joe Marsh, the comedy cartoonist, has 
been appointed resident manager of E. 
W. McConnell’s "Battle of the Monitor 
and the Merrimac” at the Pittsburg Ex¬ 
position. Col. Sam Haller, general man¬ 
ager for the McConnell enterprises, made 
the appointment. 



Pmnat Shipment! Welle Per Calalagaa 

Peabody School Furniture Co 

North Manchester, Ind. 


New Picture House in Montgomery. 

Montgomery, AJa., Aug. 31.—H. C. 
Farley, manager of the Empire theater, 
has secured a lease on a desirable site 
in this city, and is about to erect a new 
motion picture house. 


Gets Association Bookings 

Hannibal, Mo., Aug. 31—P. E. Good¬ 
win has secured his attractions for the 
coming season from the Western Vaude¬ 
ville Managers’ Association and the bills 
now being offered at the Goodwin the¬ 
ater are attracting large sized crowds. 


The Show World is in receipt of post¬ 
card greetings from Mr. and Mrs. Davis 
B. Levis mailed from the steamship 
Sant’ Anna of the Fabre Line, sailing 
from New York (on its maiden trip) 
August 25. The passenger list was a 
notable one, including many prominent 
in commercial and professional life. Mr. 
and Mrs. Levis are enjoying their an¬ 
nual world’s tour and are expected to 
return to the states sometime in October 



Peter Stone, of Ward & Stone, is play¬ 
ing for the first time since the recent 
illness which kept him at a Fort Wayne 
hospital for fourteen days. He hic¬ 
coughed for two weeks. 


Marie Flynn, who is seen in “The Girl 
and the Drummer,” was at one time a 
member of the Bush Temple stock com¬ 
pany. 


55 to *60; new, *100; Pro-’ 1 
naeional stereoptioon, *““ 

Model B gas outfits, I 

song sets, *1.00; odd slidt,__ __ 

film^oninshipment^ *6; ^12,000 feet, *12. Will buy gt 

H. DAVIS, Watertown, Wis. 


. FOR RENT-6,000 !« 



M usical 

Substantial, loud, 
to tune and plaj 


ences, catalogue, with full informa¬ 
tion will be sent on receipt of stamp. 

^ ALO BRAUNEISS ^ 


FRANCES SHOP 

STREET DRESSES AND GOWNS 
FOR THE PROFESSION 

CENTRAL 6024 34 MONROE ST„ CHICAGO 















































22 


THE SHOW WORLD 


September 10, 1910. 



Keep your exchange man in 

hot water till he gives you both 


“Imps” every week! There’s no earthly 
reason why he shouldn’t have them, nor why you 
shouldn’t get the benefit of them. Everybody 
acknowledges they’re by far the best on the market, yet 
they don’t cost you a blessed penny more than any other 
kind. That’s logic. You can’t dodge it. See that you get 
what you ask for. Don’t accept substitutes, excuses or bunk. 
Either get both Imps every week or switch to a good exchange! 


Watch for “The New Butler!” 


One of the most delicious Imp comedies ever produced. 
Clean cut, richly humorous from start to finish. It will set 
your whole house wild and bring them back again for more. 
Released Thursday, Sept. 22. 


And Be Sure To Get “Debt!’ 


In this film entitled “Debt” you are going to see some of 
the finest acting ever done before the eye of a camera. The 
story is simple and goes straight to the heart. Tell your 
exchange you want the Imp release of Monday,Sept. 19, sure! 


The “Imp” Apologizes 


While we were preparing to move into our new factory we 
had much trouble with dirty water and bad lights in our old 
place. The result was that we have had several complaints 
about the reels made at that time—the first serious com¬ 
plaints since the “Imp” came into existence. In our new 
place everything is perfect, so that no one will have cause 
' even the slightest complaint. Forgive us this time. It 
5 something we couldn’t help. It won’t happen again. 



;s Co. of America 


FINEST BUFFET IN THE WORLD 


THE COLONEL 


MICHELS]N & LUND Props. 

89 S. Clark St., - CHICACO 

(One door north Grand Opera House) 


nilliru SHOW PRINT 
n U N t Y photo engravers 
II V II k. 1 block, type, zinc 


■penalty. Designers', Engravers, Show Printers. 

RUNEY PRINT, SSBffifcno 


hotel edward 


Rooms with Private 


$1.00 Day 


Make $200-1,000 Monthly 

Own a Proctor Portrait Camera 

money making todayYs” 

Ing pictures with th» «>- 



EI Oh?o & Clifton (Keiths >’ Columbus, 
Dutton (Bijou), Ciin- 


Ohio. 

Ehrendall Bros, t 
" Iowa. 

Shorty (Orpheum), jj’Canton, 
Eugene Trio (Pain's 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ellsworth & Lindon (Empress), Kansas 


Edwar 


Eagle, The, & the Girl, Dallas, Tex. 
Eenton & Vallorie (Orpheum), Lincoln 
Fields & La Adelia (Arcade), Toledo 


drecl beautllul tr_. „ ...- 

pod. and a package of developer to 
Send us three dollas now and we wl„ , 
seven dollars C. O. D. Put the Camera in 
earn big money every day. and pay us tt 
live dollars when you have proved that e 
say above Is true. Additional buttons 01 


Ohio. 

Fisher, Mr. and Mrs. Perkins (Los 
geles), Los Angeles, Calif. 

Frey Twins Co. (Colonial), Norfolk, Va 
net. rr «, Co (Majestic) 


Fiske, Katherine K., 

Washington, Ind. 

Fink’s Mules and Dogs (State Fair) 


Louisville, Ky. 

Franciscos, The, Wilmington, Ohio. 
Finney, Maud & Gladys (Majestic), Chi 
cago. 

Fay, Two Coleys & Fay (Temple), De 


Fairman, Furman & Fairman (Poll's) 
Hartford, Conn. 

Fern & Mack (Lynch’s), Woonsocket 


ARTISTS’ ROUTES. 

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 12 


Feichtl’s, Otto, Tyroleans (Ohio Valley 
Expo.), Cincinnati 


D’Arville, Jeanette, General Deli 
Chicago. 

Adelaide Trio (Western Fair), London 


Albas, 


Can. 


(Western : 




sr’s Polar Bears (Exposition Park) 
a.ock Island, Ill. 

Araki Jap Troupe (Exposition Park) 
Rock Island, Ill., 12-17. 

Adonis & Dog (Poli s) Hartford. 
American Comedy Four (Orpheum), 
Zanesville. 

Adelmann, Joseph, Family (Orpheum), 
Spokane. 

Arnolda, Chas. (Horne’s Pavilion), Lima, 
Ohio. 

Abdallahs, Six (Orpheum), Spokane. 
Apdale’s Animals (Orpheum), Ogden. 
Alpha Troupe (Orpheum), Omaha, Neb. 
Alfarretta, Symonds, Ryan & Adams 


Gaylor, Chas. (Street Fair), Fairfax, 
Mo. 

Golden, Claude (Pantages - ), Portland, 


Goldsmith & Hoppe (Poll’s), Hartford 


Glose, Augusta (Orpheum), New Or 
leans. La. 

Gordon & Henry (Alamo), Birmingham 


Harris & Randall (Hippodrome), Lex 
ington, Ky. 

Hasty, Charlie (Orpheum), Savannah 


(Los Angeles), Los 


Haas Bros. 


Edith (Orpheum), Savannah, Ga. 
Bros. (State Fair), Indianapolis, 


Bretonne, May & i 


Harper & Jameson, Box 1145, Musko 
(Star), McKees gee, Okla. 

Harger, Polly, 2705 Dunkeld place, Den 


Boyle Bros. (Majestic), St. Paul, Minn. 
Barber & Palmer, 617 N. Second St., 
South Omaha, Neb. 

Beyer & Bro., Ben (Orpheum), Port- 


Barnett & Oliver (Lyric), Elkhart, Ind. 
Brown, Bobby, 1055 Frank street, Chi- 


-m, Clarence (Hippodrome), Hunt¬ 
ington, W. Va. 

Browning, Arthur (Gaiety), Indian- 

Bradleys, The (Orpheum), Dallas, Tex. 
" " 3 (Wester " ’ ' ' 


Hamilton, Harry, & Co. (O. H.), Hunt 
ingdon, Ore. 

Hoffer, Cora Mickle, & Co. (Sittner’s), 
Chicago. 

Hayden, Virginia (Cresco Hotel), San 
Francisco. 

Hanlon Bros. (Ramona Park), Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

Hayward & Hayward (Orpheum), Salt 
Harnish, Mamie (Keith’s), Providence, 


Balton Troupe (Western Fair), London, 


r & Meredith (Cosmos), Washing- 


Neb. 

Benton, Elwood (Grand), Cleveland. 
Ballots, The (Fair), Marshalltown, Iowa. 
Buckley, Louise, & Co. (Crystal), Port¬ 
land, Ore. 

Brisson, Alex (Majestic), Seattle. 


Hall, Pritchard & Mountain, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

Harvey & De Vora Trio (Orpheum), Los 
Havelocks, The Majestic), Cedar Rapids, 


Barcklay, Gertrude (Fair), Huron. 


Inness & Ryan (New Majestic), Rock- 


i Mr. 


Curran, Francis E. (Orpheum), Palatka, 
Fla., 12-14; (Circle), Gainesville. 15-17. 
Charbinos, Three (Keith’s), Boston, 


Crow], Room 630, Wabash building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Irwins, Two, 3684 E. 71st street, Cleve¬ 
land. 

Ishikawa Jap Troupe, 7300 Sangamon 
street, Chicago. 


Carpenters, The (Capitol), Frankfort. 
Closes, Five Aerial (New Murray), Rich¬ 
mond, Ind. 

Carroll & Gillett Troupe (Bijou), Flint, 
Mich. 

Cowles Family (Fair), Mandan, N. D. 


Jones. Alexander (O. H.). Greensburg. 
Jarrell Co., 2115 Cleveland avenue, Chi- 


Jarvis & Harrison, 
Hartford, Conn. 
Jennings & Renfre 


Gofer, Tom (Michelso’n), Grand Island, 
Neb. 

Cummings & Thornton, (Majestic), Co- 


6 McKinley street, 
iv, 714 Broadway, 
Pecan street, Oak 


IE FINEST SHOW PAINTINGS in the LAND at the LOWEST 


Cleveland, Claude & Marion (Armory), 
Binghamton, N. Y. 


. Mag¬ 


nificent Dye Drops a Specialty. Handsome Scenery it. 
M. P. Theatres, Opera Houses and Stock Cos. at very low 
rates. Show Banners and Carnival Fronts that draw the 
Crowds. Tell us what you need and we will send you 
lowest price on job and illustrated catalog. 

THE ENKEBOLL ART CO., 27th and Fort Sts., OmahajNeb r 


_ & Pearson (Electric), Manhat¬ 
tan), Kan. 

Cavana (Orpheum), Portland, Ore. 
Clermonto & Miner (Pekin), Chicago. 
Cressy & Dayne (Orpheum), Denver. 


Jeunets, The, 948 N. Western avenue, 
Chicago. 

Johnstons, Musical, 388 Eighth avenue, 
New York City. WHoi 

Jones, Roy. 1553 Broadway. New York. 
Jones & Whitehead, " 
eighth street. New ' 

Jordan, Earl, 209 F 
ington, Ky. 


Twenty- 
I. Sixth Street, Lex- 


i York. 


Doyle & Fields (Keith), Columbus, Ohio. 
Davis & Co., Edward’ (Orpheum), Salt 
Lake City, Utah. 

Dean, Orr & Gallagher (Colonial), In¬ 
dianapolis, Ind. 


Bell (Royal Airdome). 
Kaufman Troupe (Orpheum), Oakland, 


Cal. 


Kelly'& Rio (Olympic), New York. 
Knight Bros. & Sawtelle (Keith’s), Prov- 


Dwyer, Lottie, Trio (Star), Munoie, Ind. 
Davis, Edwards (Orpheum), Salt Lake. 
Davis Imperial Trio (Majestic), Butte, 


Knight- 

idence, R. ±. , 

Klein & Clifton (Fox). Aurora, Ill. 
Karl (Temple), Detroit. 

Knight, Harlan E. & Co, (Mary An 
son). Louisville. 

Konerz Bros. (Poll’s), Scrantom Pa. 
Kurtis-Busse Dogs (Frar 
Kendall, Er— * " 


Duprez, Fred (Orpheum), Seattle. 


logs (Francais). Montreal. 
Jf (Grand), Hamilton 
White (Orpheum). St. 



































THE SHOW WORLD 


23 






I 




TREATMENT FOR 

DRINK HABIT 

CURES IN THREE DAYS 



NO HYPODERMIC INJECTIONS 

1 ’ c ‘" “ vs; SylHiiS?' <J1 


For Sale For Sale 

- pictures and vaudeville. 

For full particulars address R. M. W, care Show World 

Specialties 
Staple Goods 
and Novelties 

f|P| 

Suitable for Prizes, Souvenirs, 
Premiums and favors for 
Skating Rinks, Games and 5c 
Theatres. We have a big 
variety. Send for FREE 


OOODCVDQVKK 

N. Shure Co. 


|§|g 

IMPERIAL DECORATING 
COMPANY 

L. BLAND, Mgr. Phone Main 4139 

96 Flft SU*T V E e 2 9 C 3 H o' CAGO 

TENTS 


® Portable Lights 

I| For All Purposes 

W^r~r£& 

aH-sSSS 

Saw™ 







































The Show People’s Newspaper CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER 10, 1910. For All Kinds of Show People 





WESTERN MORRIS 
MANAGER DENIES 
HE’S BEEN DEPOSED 


Walter Hoff Seeley’s Bald Statement Puts New Complexion 
on the Tangle 



SENSATIONAL EX¬ 
POSE OF GRAFT 

AMONG F. 0. E. 


Showmen Materially Interested Because There Are Many 
Amusement Men in the Order